Email Addresses Marketing – A Quick Guide to EMail Marketing

Email addresses marketing, or better known as email marketing, is a method used for specifically communicating with a targeted audience, or a niche market, to promote your website, or enhance awareness regarding certain products or services. Or, in a broader sense, email addresses marketing refer to emails sent to clients or potential clients to give them a more in-depth knowledge of your business.

Email addresses marketing can be a very efficient technique to notify customers about upcoming events, supply information about existing or new products or services, or to increase their understanding about what business offers. The foundation for a successful email addresses marketing is to have access to in-house client lists and to expand those lists through various means. Your email list will allow you to develop a long-term relationship with your online customers, which will lead to established communication and the possibility of selling products or services to them over and over again.

The three main methods of email addresses marketing are:

o Placing advertisements in emails sent by others.
o Sending direct marketing emails for trial and winning new clients or convincing existing clients to make a purchase again.
o Sending emails to customers for the purposes of improving your relationship with them.

Here are three ways to create and maintain an email list:

o Use an Opt-In – Put an Opt-In, also known as a sign-up box, on your Website and on every single page. Once this is completed, you can gather customers' email addresses and email them about your products, services or any updates on your website.

o Promote your newsletter by forwarding them to a friend or feature a contest – You can get the recipients of your emails to help in the promotional work for you by including a forward to a friend link in your emails to them. Once the recipients' friends and family members have received the forwarded email, you can then send them an email asking them to subscribe to your email or newsletter.

o Offer free content – You can also try sending out to your recipients a whitepaper or something similar. In order to receive the content, have them provide you with information including email addresses. However, make sure that you include a note at the bottom of your email informing them that you intend to email them from that point forward.

Consider the discussion above and the points raised before you venture into email addresses marketing to maximize your chances at success.

3 Criteria For Goals That Will Truly Motivate Your Team

I'm sure all of us are looking for ways to inspire our athletes to achieve their highest potential. And I'm sure all of us agree that goal setting is an integral part to any successful season. Based on his TEDtalk, "Why We Do What We Do" , Tony Robbins gives us a "map" to properly motivating our teams. First, we have to give each individual a role on the team. Then we have to find out how to meet their emotional needs. Finally, we give them the tools to make their team experience positive. Read on to find out how!

3 Things Coaches Should Understand in Order to Motivate Our Teams

Three questions. Robbins says that every decision we make (Will I go all out in practice? Will I try something new and risk looking bad until I master the skill?) Requires us to answer three questions. He calls them the Three Decisions of Destiny.

The first question is "What am I going to focus on?". Let's use "will I go all out in practice?" as our sample. We have to get our players to focus on how their effort will benefit their team and help the team get closer to accomplishing their goals. So rather than focusing on the pain that they feel in working hard, their attention is on doing their part for the team.

The second question is "What does it mean?". Going all out in practice means verbally supporting one's teams, giving complete physical effort, and being willing to do whatever they're asked by the coach.

The third and final question is "What am I going to do?". To make sure they go all out each practice, they will eat healthily, get plenty of sleep, and remain focused on their sport during practice times.

6 Human Needs.

We all are motivated by these six emotions / needs / beliefs … it's the coach's job to find out what button to push for each student-athlete.

The 1st need is certainty. There are some things that our players need to know without a doubt: For example, the coach is knowledgeable, fair, and caring.

The 2nd need is uncertainty. I know that sees to contradict the first, but I do not think it does. While some things should be set in stone, others like playing time and the starting lineup should not be certain … otherwise our starters will become complacent and the non-starters will be apathetic.

The 3rd need is critical significance. Our teams should have a compelling reason for coming to the gym every day … and it's our job to give it to them.

The 4th need is connection and love. We all want to feel like we belong to something special and that there are folks out there who care about us.

The 5th need is growth. If a player feels that they were not given the opportunity to get better (with skill, with leadership, with self-awareness), why come to practice every day?

The 6th need is the ability to contribute beyond ourselves. Whether it's team community service, sacrificing personal goals to help the team win a significant victory, or challenging your seniors to leave their mark on the team … we've got to give our players the ability to make a difference.

Becoming influential. So we're still using our sample question, "will I go all out in practice?", As the example for this goal setting technique. In this final step of the motivation process, we help our athletes create a positive situation for themselves. We should ask them what their target is … meaning what do they hope to accomplish by going all out in practice (respect from peers, etc.)? Next is to find out what their belief system is … will they stoop to gossiping and backbiting a team in order to get to "connection and love"? Finally, we have to find out what fuels each athlete. Robbins says that each of us has a dominant human need (certyty, critical significance, etc.) and the player's goal has to feed that need.

Check out the video if you get a chance and see if you can put your own sports spin on things … it's well worth the watch!

Power of Branding and Freedom of Poetry

Maya Angelou once said (I'm paraphrasing) '' the purpose of all life is to be able to live like a poet one day. '' She went on to say that since poets already live like poets, their lives were not a postpone project, but the-ultimate-goal-realized by default.

How many times we have heard of those retirement dreams … the narratives that inevitably start with '' one day I'd like to … '' and continues with a description of one idyllic state or another … a beach house in Key West … playing golf eight hours a day in Arizona … buying a summer house in Florida and moving for good … writing (ah, at long last) that great novel, the chapters of which are lying somewhere inside those moldy cardboard boxes in the basement … to take the oath of chastity and join a monastery or a yoga ashram … take that trip to the Far East … or maybe even to throw itself with passion into a cause that is much larger than one's own limited life, like a political party, a crusade, a fund-raising juggernaut perhaps … on and on.

But underneath it all the aim is to arrive at that sublime state of inner peace and gentleness, something ill-defined but real, fuzzy but warm, a feeling that we feel is our birthright. Underneath it all we do not all point the gyroscopes of our lives to that nebulous state of elation and redemption that we sometimes refer to as '' poetic ''?

The rest is mostly a life-long process of branding ourselves as a desirable product in this increasingly globalized and fickle marketplace.

A brand is a total image with a price, a consistent package with defined and perceived borders. We are engineers. Attorneys. Machinists. Singers. Doctors. Teachers. Experts. Go-to guys. Ministers. Project managers. Historians. Curators. Tank drivers. Chefs. Shrinks. Plumbing … and, yes, Poets. Poets come in branded varieties as well. There is even a '' Poet Laurate '' for the whole United States (for the last few years we were extremely fortunate to have Billy Collins and Stanley Kunits and Ted Kooser as the PT Person).

All branding by definition shuns contradiction and ambivalence like a plague.

Fuzzy logic is fine for hi-tech digital cam-recorders but not for the experts that command healthy speaking fees. CEOs and four star generals are not expected to wear their troubling questions on their sleeves. Researchers at NIH do not get grants and doctors for not knowing what to do in the face of a new virus strain.

If things do not make sense outside a certain framework, then a branded professional knows how not to step outside that framework. A brand provides reproducible solutions to carefully-worded questions. Existentential panic does not command a premium price on the capitalist auction block.

Poetry, on the other hand, is a vulnerable exploration into everything that is left out by branding. It has no guarantees. No guidelines.

You can certainly encourage people to write poems. But I'm not sure at all if you can '' teach '' how to write poetry with the kind of money-back-guarantee bravado that is commonplace for a successful brand.

It is the only Odyssey that each person has to take all alone, go out and wander in the world, meet his demons, take them on one by one, beat them and return home victorious … only to do the same all over again the very next day.

Poetry, to use an analogy that Billy Collins has used in an Alaskan Quarterly Review interview, is like finding something curious sticking out from the sand in a desert and removing all that sand to discover the rest of the intriguing object. In that, poetry represents a vast freedom to rediscover all that is hidden from or by power.

Poetry raises all the in-between states and ambiguities censored by branding. So it is subversive by default.

However in that subversion there is also a deep affirmation of the most basic human value of all – freedom. That's despite the only thing branding can not buy and sell in the marketplace. A brand's power depends only on consumption. Poetry, on the other hand, is free the moment it is produced.

Our world needs more poets get into branded power play. Certainly someone like Leopold Sedar Senghor, a poet who became a statesman, will be remembered for his uplifting and dignified approach to international conflict. And conversely, I hope more branded professionals get into poetry as a way to humanize the market place of good and services.

What if the United Nations held a Poetry Workshop for one day of the year, with mandatory participation for all heads of state?

What if everyone in the world voted for the best Power Poet of the year through the Internet and the winner was declared on Valentine's Day?

Or what if Fortune 500 companies had poetry classes for their managers? Would not that be the ultimate out-of-the-box thinking and problem-solving bonanza on stereoids?

And what would happen if before one country attacked another, the presidents and top generals from both sides were forced to lock themselves in a room and write at least one poem, expressing why they hate the "other guys" and why they must fight? What if those poems were then distributed to the citizens of both nations and the world? Perhaps they would still go on and fight. And otherwise, just a tiny little shivering perhaps, they would not.

Without poetic abilities, branding easily degrades into a repetition of the past. If you are building a bridge, repetition of the past experience might actually be a beneficial discipline since no one wants to re-discover trigonometry every time there is a river to cross.

But in much more complex affairs of the heart, of which I consider international politics to institute just a small subset, the vulnerable freedom of a poem could be the only thing standing between our endangered humanity and the discovery of our birthright freedom – and even perhaps salvation.

A Brief History Of The Traveling Funfair

Fairs in this country have a long and ancient history, deeply rooted in tradition.

The word fair is derived from the Latin 'feria', meaning a holiday and at one time the Romans were credited with the introduction of fairs.

It is now generally accepted that their origins are from pagan customs of the people who first settled this land; their seasonal gatherings held for the purposes of both trade and festivity, contained within them the essential elements of the fair.

The Romans did much to promote fairs by improving trade and communications throughout the country.

During the centuries following the departure of the Romans, many fairs and other festivals were incorporated into the calendar of the growing Christian Church. Charters granted by the sovereign gain the fair legal status and an increasing importance in the economic life of the nation.

Merchants and traders from Europe, the Middle East and beyond were drawn to the great chartered fairs of the Middle Ages bringing with them a wealth of goods.

The sheer number of these fairs, no fewer than 4860 were chartered between the years 1200 and 1400, drew not only merchant but entertainers as well: jugglers, musicians and tumblers – the ancestors of today's showmen.

The Black Death of 1348-49 thought about a new kind of fair. In order to stem the rise in wages caused by the shortage of workers, Edward III introduced the Statue of Labourers. This compelled all able bodied men to present themselly for hire at a stipulated wage. These gathering or burning fairs were held mainly around Michealmas, the end of the agricultural year.

By the early eighth century the trading aspects of the charter fairs had waned and most fairs consistently almost entirely of amusements, acrobats, illusionists and theatrical companies all plied their trade on fairgrounds.

Around this time the first fairground rides begin to appear, small crudely constructed out of wood and propelled by gangs of boys.

In 1868, Frederick Savage, a successful agricultural engineer from Kings Lynn, devised a method of driving rides by steam. His invention, a steam engine mounted in the center of the ride was to transform the fairground industry. Freed from the limitations of muscle power, rides could have made larger, more massive and more heavily ornamented. The showman's demand for novelty was matched by the ingenuity of Savage and other engineers.

In the wake of the steam revolution an amazing variety of new designs and rides appeared. These rides were the forerunners of today's amazing thrill rides, over time innovations such as electric lighting, electric motors, hydraulics etc. allowed rides to evolve into the amazing devices that are seen today at any local fairground.